WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT COMPLIANCE OF STEEL MATERIALS IN CONSTRUCTION

www.steelcompliance.com is a comprehensive information source on what customers, specifiers, users and certifiers need to know about proving compliance of construction steel products to Australian and New Zealand Standards.

There is growing concern about whether building products comply with the relevant Australian and New Zealand Standards. Compliance of products and services in the Australasian markets with Australian/New Zealand Standards is normally voluntary, unless the products or services are regulated by Government.

In this website we provide guidance on the following areas:

WHY the need for Steel Compliance

The reasons you need to consider obtaining third party certificates of product compliance

WHAT is Steel Compliance

Detail on different types of compliance and certification of construction steel products and other building products

WHO offers Steel Compliance

Detail on who provides what in the certification area and comparison of the apples and oranges available

HOW to ensure Steel Compliance

Detail on how to specify the right Certificate of Product Compliance, how to check that the products do comply, and how to ensure that project teams are aware of the requirements

The Steel Compliance website is provided as a risk mitigation service to the construction community by ACRS – the Australasian Certification Authority for Reinforcing and Structural Steels - email info@steelcertification.com

 

WHY the need for Steel Compliance

Reasons you need to consider obtaining third party certificates of product compliance

How can construction project managers, steel fabricators and engineering specifiers reduce their risk of substandard materials and potential failures?

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Suppliers, users and specifiers take responsibility for product quality and carry the risk if product failure occurs. How do you minimise your Risk?

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Are you exposed to increased risk on your construction projects?

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The dangers of using non-compliant materials

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NON-COMPLIANCE CASE STUDIES

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What else can reduce the project team risk?

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WHO offers Steel Compliance

Detail on who provides what in the certification area and comparison of the apples and oranges available

Are all third party steel certifiers the same?

NO. Third Party Certification Schemes reduce the risk of buying and using products which do not meet minimum requirements, and enable feedback and corrective action in case problems arise.  Major construction clients, designers and contractors specify Product Certification Schemes to gain assurance of consistent product quality.

Some certifiers like ACRS are much more rigorous than others, particularly in respect to the independent verification testing of steel products in the following areas:

ACRS select the samples for verification testing rather than allow the manufacturer to selectively provide the samples.

The choice of laboratory for the verification testing is chosen by ACRS and not dictated by the manufacturers.

ACRS are focused on steel construction materials and so all its product certifiers are experts with technical backgrounds in construction steels rather than general product certifiers with some knowledge of construction steels.

Certification of the supplier’s Quality system or Testing laboratory does NOT include Certification of product manufactured.  

Each of these three requirements require their own specific certification of compliance to the relevant requirements.

Independent third party steel product certification bodies such as ACRS offer demonstrated technical expertise and rigorous verification - more than ISO9000 based certification schemes.

 

Some Australian examples of rigorous third party certification schemes

Australian Window Association Certificate of Compliance

All window manufacturers must comply with Australian Standard 2047 and must be able to verify compliance on request.  The AWA Certificate of Compliance confirms that the manufacturer is a participating member of the AWA Accreditation Programme, provides a 6 year warranty against faulty workmanship and materials, is committed to the AWA Code of Conduct, and has met the requirements of the annual AWA Compliance Audit conducted by a NATA accredited auditor.

The Engineered Wood Products Association of Australasia (EWPAA) Product Certification Schemes

These include Plywood, Laminated Veneer Lumber, Particle Board, Fibreboard, Plantation Timber and other timber products so users can be totally confident of the quality of the material they are buying. In 2011 the Association tested numerous samples of imported decorative plywood for wall lining and particle board used in flat-pack kitchen cabinets and found emissions of formaldehyde were two to four times higher than Australian limits.

The Australasian Certification Authority for Reinforcing and Structural Steels - ACRS

ACRS administers a specialist industry-based, independent, not for profit, third-party product certification scheme which certifies reinforcing, prestressing and structural steels to Australian Standards.  The ACRS scheme has been in place for steel reinforcing and prestressing materials since 2003, and for structural steels since 2011, and ACRS is currently working towards JAS-ANZ accreditation to ISO17065. Manufacturers in over 150 locations in over a dozen countries now use ACRS to demonstrate that their products comply with Australian Standards such as AS4671, AS4672, AS3679, AS3678 and AS1163.  

The rigorous third party verification processes includes minimum annual inspections of all products in all locations of suppliers, with quarterly monitoring of long term quality production data and third party testing independently organised by ACRS.  

ACRS certification checks that processes and materials are benchmarked to appropriate Standards and confirms the certificate holder’s quality systems are both functional and appropriate for the Standard concerned.  

The ACRS 'Mark' is a recognised means of showing conformity to AS/NZ Standards, and provides a mechanism to ensure that compliance is clearly demonstrated to be more than a manufacturer’s statement. ACRS assessment ensures a level playing field of compliant suppliers both local and offshore.

ACRS assessments, checklists and ongoing monitoring every quarter of compliant suppliers can play an important part in bringing you peace of mind in these situations.

The above are just some examples of where bodies are being created to ensure a level playing field for local and imported suppliers, and to reduce the risk of non-compliance for specifiers and users.  

Checklists and other tools are now being provided for building certifiers to assist them in asking the right questions on projects in order to check and be able to certify compliance.

 

WHAT is steel compliance

Detail on different types of compliance and certification of construction steel products and other building products

The four methods of demonstrating compliance

First party certification of compliance is where the Manufacturer publishes a statement that its products comply. In this case the user takes the supplier’s word for whether it has the required quality – caveat emptor.


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Why independent third party certification is the answer

Third Party Product Certification provides a level of confidence for governments, certifiers and users across the world who are grappling with the issue of how to ensure compliance with specifications, and avoid the costs of rework and litigation.
Read More
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Why do I need to specify steels that are third party certified as opposed to just specifying mill test certificates?

Mill test certificates that are required by AS4100 to verify compliant steel are produced by the manufacturer and therefore a first party conformity assessment document.
Read More
Read More

 

How to Ensure Steel Compliance

Detail on how to specify the right Certificate of Product Compliance, how to check that the products do comply, and how to ensure that project teams are aware of the requirements

How do I know that a manufacturer’s product is certified and that the certification is current?

Read More
Read More

What do I need to do to ensure I get ACRS certified Steel?


Read More
Read More

ACRS sets the standard for independent third party product certification


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Read More

ACRS completes the Three Part Chain of Certification

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What does ACRS offer?
Who are our members?

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ACRS Mission

“The continued manufacture and supply of reliable, safe, consistent quality structural, reinforcing and prestressing steels to Australian and New Zealand Standards”

How can construction project managers, steel fabricators and engineering specifiers reduce their risk of substandard materials and potential failures?

Improving health and safety and reducing risk are key issues for all Managers nowadays.

There is growing concern about whether building materials comply with the relevant Australian Standards as not all structural, prestressing and reinforcing steel materials sold in Australia and New Zealand meet Australian and New Zealand Standards.

Standards Australia develops Australian Standards but does not have a direct role in ensuring the compliance of products or services with these standards. Australia trades in a global marketplace, but Australia does not mandate certified product conformity and compliance requirements in Standards.

Compliance of materials and services in the Australian market with Australian Standards is normally voluntary unless the materials or services are regulated by Government.

The Building Code of Australia gives some regulation but the onus is on builders and specifiers to check compliance.

Independent third party certification of compliance is comprehensive and is where test specimens are selected by an independent third party certifier and not the supplier, and where the third party testing is also independently organised by the certifier as opposed to the supplier’s choice of laboratory.

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Suppliers, users and specifiers take responsibility for product quality and carry the risk if product failure occurs. How do you minimise your Risk?

Builders are reliant on their professional advisers to certify their projects and they need help to reduce their risks and legal liabilities. Independent third party certifying can provide this.

The Government will not do it for you – no-one will enforce the Building Code on your projects except you.

Ensuring that materials are independently tested and certified to comply with Standards is a risk management issue.

Effective product quality checking processes are necessary if the risks and potential consequences of failures are to be avoided, as some suppliers are tempted to reduce quality.

Reduce Your Risk With Third Party Verified Materials – Quality Certified Construction Steel Products “You may not be getting what you think you are”

Independent third party certification of compliance is comprehensive and is where test specimens are selected by an independent third party certifier and not the supplier, and where the third party testing is also independently organised by the certifier as opposed to the supplier’s choice of laboratory.

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Are you exposed to increased risk on your construction projects?

With the increase in globalisation, products are now sourced from all over the world, which makes the task of users, specifiers and certifiers increasingly difficult in terms of ensuring that the correct level of product quality is achieved on Australian buildings.

In these difficult times choosing compliant products is even more important as the temptation to cut corners, or make do with sub-standard materials is fraught with danger. There have been many examples reported of failures of products on building sites. Many more problems are likely to occur, but are not reported, or made known to the specifier, purchaser and user.

Suppliers, users, specifiers and certifiers all need effective processes in place to reduce the risks as they take responsibility for construction product quality and the consequences if product failures occur. We need everyone involved in the building process to think of how they can reduce their risks and liabilities which encompass safety, cost of repairs, penalties and legal expenses to name just a few of the exposures.

The objective must be to have processes in place that ensure problems are avoided upfront, by ensuring reputable supply and confidence in quality provided, particularly for different types of materials which nowadays as well as individual products include fabricated and pre-assembled components.

Independent third party certification of compliance is comprehensive and is where test specimens are selected by an independent third party certifier and not the supplier, and where the third party testing is also independently organised by the certifier as opposed to the supplier’s choice of laboratory.

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The dangers of using non-compliant materials

Non-complying building materials have been shown to result in project delays (for instance, requiring additional testing), cause consequential costs to involved parties (for instance, requiring substantial redesign) and even ended in potential court cases. Some of the problems identified are inadequate product traceability, misleading and false supporting documentation such as fraudulent test certificates, excessive variation in materials properties, and incorrect or inappropriate product markings.

Providing a regulatory climate to foster compliance with Standards is a challenge for every level of Government in Australia as well as every user and specifier of building products. If products are not tested, how do manufacturers and buyers know the product quality, how do designers and specifiers know the product design limits, and how can building certifiers attest for safety and compliance? Suppliers, users and specifiers therefore take responsibility for construction product quality, and carry the risk if product failure occurs.

The Building Code of Australia is referenced in every Building Act in Australia, therefore it is part of building law. The BCA outlines quite specifically, how compliance of materials and systems is to be met. It states that evidence of suitability must be provided by one of the means set out in A2.2 of volume 1 and 1.2.2 of volume 2. This is one area of responsibility that falls to the builder, and it is sometimes ignored. Like it or not, the BCA and referenced standards have to be followed in one form or another to comply with the law, but many builders and subcontractors perform work without ever referencing these documents. Project work is undertaken in a professional manner but it can be questionable as to whether it actually complies.

We therefore need to ensure that the builder and his advisers check compliance on each project. Unfortunately, there are many products used that are not subject to the scrutiny they should be. This potential minefield is not new to the building industry, and it could be argued that many builders have been using products without being aware of the consequences for decades. The big difference these days is that due to globalisation the integrity of manufacturers is no longer seen as being automatically above reproach.

Assisting engineers, certifiers and surveyors to ask the right questions when they are signing off projects for the builder is also increasingly important, as an important means to ensure a minimum level of quality and compliance to the relevant codes and standards. Builders are reliant on their professional advisers to certify their projects, and they need easy to use tools available to ensure these tasks are carried out professionally and efficiently.

John Thwaites, the Chairman of the Australian Building Codes Board at a recent HIA Compliance Summit said the following: The need for products to be ‘fit for purpose’ is not just the responsibility of building certifiers or builders. All parties in the supply chain have responsibility: manufacturers, designers, engineers, certifiers and installers. Both the ABCB and all affected industry associations have roles in undertaking national education and awareness programs, including collaboration together to alert practitioners as to what they should be looking for, to ensure practitioners understand the certification schemes and requirements for compliance under relevant regulations, and to facilitate greater levels of compliance within the construction industry.

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NON-COMPLIANCE CASE STUDIES

RAAF Fairbairn Hanger case study – hangar collapsed injuring 12 workers

Qld bus station case study - Parts Failing - focus on price not quality led to inconsistent quality due to 300 tonnes of steel sourced from 19 countries and 32 steel mills

Steel products corrosion - Some products may not have been tested, for as long or as rigorously to comply with the Australian environment.

Many foreign standards use Total Coated Thickness (TCT) to describe steel product thickness which may not be suitable for design loads under Australian Standards.

Some pre-painted steel products sold in Australia to AS2728:2007 do not use AS1397:2001 compliant substrate (base metallic coated steel).

The minimum single-spot coating mass requirement in the American Standard ASTMA792M is lower than required by the Australian Standard AS1397:2001. If the lower coating mass side is exposed, the material may not perform the same as an AS1397:2001 compliant product.

The imported material is being positioned to compete with, but is not necessarily equivalent to, BlueScope’s manufactured product including Zincalume steel and Truecore steel, both of which conform to AS1397.

If coating thickness and base metal thickness of products made to foreign standards do not meet the minimum requirements set out by AS1397, this may result in reduced durability and structural design performance.

“Build with Standards” website – from OneSteel - highlights recent changes to Australian Standards for structural steel which have been introduced to address industry concerns regarding improved product quality, identification, certification and traceability. The goal is to improve compliance and generate increased confidence in structural steel quality in all end-use applications. Up until now, all structural steel has appeared the same. With the revised Australian Standards and its mandatory requirements around markings and test certificates, industry stakeholders can readily check if the steel used was produced to Australian Standards and the specifications called up in the design.

Fair Trading NSW recently issued a warning that hundreds of households may have hot water tanks - manufactured and imported from China - not approved for use in Australia which posed a serious risk to health and safety.

Timber frame anchors & bracing

The Australian Building Code requires that structural connectors such as framing anchors and metal strap for tie down and bracing of timber framed buildings complies with AS1684.2-2010. The standard states that these products must be manufactured from a minimum steel grade of G300. Grades below this such as G2 don’t have this guarantee.

The other critical specification for steel quality relates to the corrosion resistance of the products. To comply with the code, products must have a minimum galvanizing coating of Z275 (a minimum of 15.4um of galvanizing per surface.

Pryda has carried out internally or commissioned authorized independent testing companies to test a range of timber connector and strap brace brands being sold to builders around Australia. Tests conducted included salt spray corrosion testing, spectrometer metal analysis, magnetic induction and micro photography coating thickness analysis. The results clearly show that many of the products being sold in hardware and trade outlets do not comply with the AS1684.2-20010.

Productivity Commission Issues Paper on Compliance 2004

BSA (Queensland Building Services Authority) is aware of an increasing trend of non-compliant or poor performing goods manufactured overseas for the Australian building industry. Examples include non-compliant; structural nuts and bolts, roof sheeting, window frames, plywood, floor tiles, finishing plaster, wall paint, etc.

The increasingly diverse range of imported building products will be subject to various compliance standards when installed as building work. Builders will rely on performance assurances from suppliers (manufacturers), and certifiers will rely on compliance assurances from builders. Manufacturers’ of imported products may not offer adequate advice or recommendation on installation or performance.

Verification of performance is dependent on competent persons, reliable certification, manufacturers’ recommendation, and Australian Standards as specified by the Building Codes of Australia and the Integrated Planning Act. If provision for product importation fails to adequately manage the risk of non-compliant building products, prior to building work commencing, then building certifiers and builders may be burdened with an unnecessary risk of non-compliant imported products.

Social expectation in relation to poor product performance inadvertently ends up in costly dispute. The burden of civil litigation that consumers or contractors may have to engage against suppliers and (offshore) manufacturers as a result of defective imported building products can have a significant impact on community resources.

It should be noted that local supply industries competing with imported products must demonstrate compliance and afford a relatively lengthy and costly process as a disadvantage to imported competition that currently may not be so burdened.

The Australian Industry Group report, “The quest for a level playing field, The non-conforming building products dilemma”, November 2013.

Non-conforming products: do not meet regulatory, Australian or industry standards; are not fit for their intended purpose; are not of acceptable quality; contain false or misleading claims or are counterfeit product.

A growing body of Australian building and construction stakeholders (including product manufacturers/suppliers, government and industry procurers, designers/engineers, building surveyors, builders/constructors and technical infrastructure bodies) agree that non-conforming products1 (NCPs) pose a risk to productivity, safety, consumer value and legitimate manufacturers (based both in Australia and overseas). Improvements are needed to the existing conformance framework or product quality will continue to decrease resulting in increased risks to Australian manufacturers, construction workers and the public.

This report raises serious concerns about the effectiveness of Australia’s approach to ensuring the quality and safety of building and construction products.

These concerns put a spotlight on the design and effectiveness of the conformance framework – the standards and regulations - that we rely on to ensure that products are fit for purpose. Conformance frameworks also need to be effective to ensure there is a fair and level playing field for the businesses that do adhere to relevant standards and regulations.

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What else can reduce the project team risk?

Updating training of trades and professional advisers involved with building projects is increasing necessary if compliance is to be monitored effectively. Many building industry Associations offer these facilities and the opportunity to gain CPD points as well as greater expertise.

But at the end of the day the old traditional “caveat emptor” applies – “Buyer Beware” is the clear message here.

The risks of non-compliance, liability and litigation are increasing. All members of the construction project team should take note and prepare themselves accordingly.

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The four methods of demonstrating compliance

First party certification of compliance is where the Manufacturer publishes a statement that its products comply.  In this case the user takes the supplier’s word for whether it has the required quality – caveat emptor.

Second party certification of compliance is where the customer arranges to have the product tested to see if it complies.  This can be very costly and is becoming rare as even Government authorities and large users have largely ceased to do their own testing.

Third party certification of compliance is when the manufacturer submits data and samples to a third party of his choice to test and monitor the quality of the product.  This is a means of demonstrated quality, but its effectiveness is dependent on the rules in place to ensure satisfactory levels of compliance, as they are often set by the supplier.

Independent third party certification of compliance is more comprehensive and is where test specimens are selected by an independent third party certifier and not the supplier, and where the third party testing is also independently organised by the certifier as opposed to the supplier’s choice of laboratory.

Having a quality management system e.g. to ISO9000 with QA certification and an ILAC/NATA accredited laboratory does not alone guarantee materials will conform to any given Standard, as Quality Management, Conformity and Compliance are not the same thing.  Suppliers need to demonstrate all three of the above, and Third Party Certification provides an independent verification review mechanism to enable this, as sampling, testing and reporting is a continuous process.  

Mill test certificates are a useful point in time batch test or snapshot, and not a substitute for Long Term Quality data being additionally reviewed regularly with frequency distributions by a third party certifier.  Ensuring that products are independently tested and certified to comply with Standards is an increasingly important risk management issue with globalisation and products being sourced from all over the world.

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Why independent third party certification is the answer

Third Party Product Certification provides a level of confidence for governments, certifiers and users across the world who are grappling with the issue of how to ensure compliance with specifications, and avoid the costs of rework and litigation.  

A world wide trend to manage this exposure is the establishment of independent third party product certification schemes with over twenty western countries now having third party assessment schemes.  For example third-party certifiers of long-standing in Europe include UKCARES, Deutsches Institut fűr Bautechnik, and IGQ – Instituto Italiano di Garanzia della Qualita.  Canada also uses a national accrediting authority model to certify a range of construction products. 

Third-party certification schemes are generally structured around the requirements of the International Standard for such bodies – ISO/Guide 65 ISO65 General requirements for Bodies operating Product Certification Systems (to be updated to ISO/IEC 17065 next year) which has been published by Standards Australia as AS/NZS 3843, and ISO67 Product Certification Body Types.

In Australia there a now a number of third part certification schemes, such as those operated by ACRS, AWA and EWPAA, and the HIA are looking at developing their own register of compliant building products and accreditation schemes.  JAS-ANZ also offers accreditation to product certification bodies or Conformity Assessment Bodies (known as CABs).

The benefits of third-party certification to the construction industry, its specifiers and clients include assured quality of product irrespective of source, increased confidence in material quality, reduced risk for all parties to a project and  reduced possibility of failure, and remedial work or delay.    

Additionally there is certainty that the products meet the requirements of the relevant Australian Standard, avoiding the need for separate inspections at the manufacturer, separate independent testing and checking test certificates.  

The improved traceability and identification also means reduced likelihood of material substitution and/or misrepresentation.  It minimise risk and provides a level playing field for the suppliers, and it provides confidence that constructors and specifiers will get the quality they are paying for and have specified.

Back to What is Steel Compliance >

Why do I need to specify steels that are third party certified as opposed to just specifying mill test certificates?

Mill test certificates that are required by AS4100 to verify compliant steel are produced by the manufacturer and therefore a first party conformity assessment document. 

Third party certified steels are in addition independently assessed to confirm that the specified requirements of the product, including the mill test certificate, comply with the relevant Australian Standard. 

Checks that the third party certifier conducts include 

  • that the manufacturer has an ISO certified quality system, 
  • that the manufacturing process has the necessary factory production control to consistently produce steel products to the relevant Australian Standard
  • that the manufacturer’s testing and certification process is also compliant with the Australian Standard.

This gives you the confidence that the mill test certificate accurately represents the steel product to which it refers

 

 

 

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How do I know that a manufacturer’s product is certified and that the certification is current?

All manufacturers with current certification are listed on the ACRS steelcertification.com website for easy verification. Unlike some certifiers who only conduct assessments every 3 or 5 years, ACRS conduct assessments annually and require manufacturers to provide quarterly test data to confirm that are consistently producing compliant steel products.

ACRS requirement that manufacturers must certify all products to certified Standards at all manufacturing locations means that it is easier to ensure that the product supplied by a particular manufacturer is ACRS certified.

Checklists and other tools are now being provided for building certifiers to assist them in asking the right questions on projects in order to check and be able to certify compliance.

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What do I need to do to ensure I get ACRS certified Steel?

To ensure you get steel which is compliant to the Australian Standard and is ACRS certified, we suggest you include the following note on the structural steel drawings and/or specification.

Structural, Reinforcing and Pre-stressing Steel shall comply with AS/NZS 1163, AS/NZS 1594, AS/NZS 3678, AS/NZS 3679.1, AS/NZS 3679.2, AS/NZS 4671 or AS/NZS4672. A valid mill certificate from the manufacturer may additionally be provided as further evidence that this requirement is met.

Acceptable manufacturers of structural, reinforcing or pre-stressing steel must also hold a valid certificate of approval issued by the Australasian Certification Authority for Reinforcing and Structural Steels Ltd (ACRS).

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ACRS sets the standard for independent third party product certification

ACRS is an independent third party certifier which monitors and verifies compliance to Australian Standards for reinforcing, pre-stressing and a growing range of structural steel materials.

Not all product certifiers are the same or offer the same service.  ACRS is focussed on product certification as its core competence.  It is a full service, independent third party certification body.

It is not a quality system certification or testing processes certification body offering limited add-on services.  It offers considerably more than ISO 9000+ providers.

ACRS is non-discriminatory. It follows established international models and is voluntary and inclusive of imported steels, regardless of country of origin or commercial affiliation.

The ACRS mark on tags and certificates is recognised as showing conformity by the certificate holder to AS/NZ Standards and ensures that compliance is demonstrated to be more than just a manufacturer’s statement.

An ACRS certificate provides confidence that constructors and specifiers will get the quality they are paying for and have specified, and satisfies the requirement to minimise risk and provide a level playing field.

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ACRS completes the Three Part Chain of Certification – Quality, Testing and Product

ACRS certification complements, but does not overlap with, the two other important certification systems usually required in the manufacture and supply of construction steels: Quality Systems Certification and Testing Laboratory Certification.

The general quality of steel materials is demonstrated through a manufacturer or supplier having certification demonstrating its quality systems meet the recognised standard ISO 9001 and that the laboratory used for testing the materials is certified as competent by a body such as NATA.

ACRS certification then verifies that the full range of testing has been performed on the full range of materials from the appropriate facilities to validate the supplier’s claims of conformity to a particular AS/NZS Standard by undertaking interim assessments through the course of each 12-month period on top of the normal yearly site audit.

ACRS reduces risk for specifiers, builders and suppliers

ACRS confirms suppliers are doing all the tests the Standards demand and then monitors the results over time. That means users can be confident ACRS approved steels from certified suppliers will meet the Standard when they buy.

Without ACRS certification, how do you know the right tests have been done and how do you know the materials arriving onsite actually passed the tests?

If only single, mill certificate type tests are relied upon for acceptance of materials from all production batches of supply, who is verifying the supply during the other 364-days in the year? ACRS does.

ACRS certification is the simplest, most reliable and most transparent means of managing risk to ensure that steel materials supplied to projects are the expected quality.

ACRS makes it easy to source compliant materials

There is usually no need to make any further checks on ACRS approved materials beyond checking the supplier’s ACRS certificate and matching it to the product tags or labels.

No more checking materials’ properties against technical specifications; no more checking batch numbers against the test certificates.

With ACRS it’s easy for suppliers, easy for customers and it’s easy for designers and certifiers.

ACRS certifies not just domestic suppliers, but also world-class, overseas manufacturers, giving Australian and international customers the widest choice of materials complying with Australian and New Zealand Standards.

ACRS currently certifies over 150 manufacturing and processing sites operated by 45 companies in 15 countries, globally.

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ACRS is supported by Construction Specifiers, Users and Suppliers

Having the construction industry’s leading organisations and experience around the ACRS Board table assists ACRS to ensure relevance and quality of processes and governance. Steel suppliers are limited to a minority position on the Board to ensure credibility, impartiality and independence.

ACRS members include:
• Australian Constructors Association
• Australian Institute of Building
• Australian Institute of Building Surveyors
• Australian Steel Institute
• Australasian Wire Industry Association
• Austroads
• Building Officials Institute of New Zealand
• Bureau of Steel Manufacturers of Australia
• Concrete Institute of Australia
• Consult Australia
• Engineers Australia
• Heavy Engineering Research Association of NZ
• Housing Industry Association
• Master Builders Australia
• National Precast Concrete Association
• Post-tensioning Institute of Australia
• Steel Reinforcement Institute of Australia
• University of Melbourne

What does ACRS offer?

Independent, rigorous, external assessment process from basic steel production to processing and onsite delivery.

Review of company QA systems to ensure processes developed by a company are being consistently followed.

Testing of finished materials to ensure they comply with the relevant Australian materials and processing Standards.

Monitoring long-term statistical recording of standards-mandated test results (often referred to as ‘LTQ testing’) to prove compliance to Australian and New Zealand Standards requirements.

Annual inspections of ALL materials in ALL locations with third party sampling and testing to corroborate long-term test reporting.

ACRS is not a quality system certification or testing processes certification body – it is a full service product certifier.

REDUCE YOUR RISK WITH ACRS VERIFIED MATERIALS

1. Hot-rolled steel bar manufacture to AS/NZS 4671
2. Hot-rolled steel bar-in-coil manufacture to AS/NZS 4671
3. Cold-drawn steel wire manufacture to AS/NZS 4671
4. Steel mesh (fabric) manufacture to AS/NZS 4671
5. Steel reinforcement processing to AS/NZS 4671
6. Prestressing steel materials manufacture
(PC bar and/or PC wire & strand) to AS/ NZS 4672
7. Cold-formed structural steel hollow section manufacture to AS/NZS 1163
8. Hot-rolled steel plate, floor plate and slab manufacture to AS/NZS 3678 and/or AS/NZS 1594
9. Hot-rolled steel bar and section manufacture to AS/NZS 3679.1
10. Structural steel I-Section manufacture to AS/NZS 3679.2

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